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On the Relations between Central Asian Countries and Russia from the 16th to the 19th Century 16-19世纪中亚各国与俄国关系论述

 Author: Lan Qi  Category: Central Asia, Chinese Scholarship, History, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Xinjiang  Publisher: Lanzhou University Press  Publication Date: 2012  Language: Chinese  Buy Now
 Description:

The Central Asian region discussed in “Eurasian Historical and Cultural Library: An Essay on the Relations between Central Asian Countries and Russia in the 16th-19th Century” refers to the five republics in Central Asia before the disintegration of the Soviet Union (the Kazakh, Uzbek, Turkmen, Kyrgyz, Tajik Soviet Socialist Republics) and Afghanistan. The study of the relations between Central Asian countries and Russia is an integral part of the study of international relations. Central Asia is located in the center of Eurasia, and Russia is located on the eastern edge of Europe, on the Eastern European Plain. Geographically, there are many obstacles between the two regions, but the North Shore of the Caspian Sea is easily accessible. The Ural Mountains is just a mountain range that has been eroded for a long time and has an average height of only 2,000 meters. It winds down to 51 degrees north latitude and no longer extends, leaving a broad and flat desert area stretching to the Caspian Sea, the Eastern European Plain and this desert area. The grasslands of northern Central Asia, which have been extending westward, gradually infiltrated into the deserts on the northern shore of the Caspian Sea, where they met the Great Plains of Eastern Europe. This terrain facilitates the communication between the Eastern European plains and the Central Asian steppes. The Eurasian Historical and Cultural Library: An Essay on the Relations between Central Asian Countries and Russia from the 16th to the 19th Century is divided into two parts. One part describes the formation and development of the Central Asian Khanates. Another section is about the development of Russian history. The unified Russian state centered on Moscow was the product of the disintegration of the Kipchak Khanate at the end of the 15th century.

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